Skip to content

Product Branding

February 9, 2012

If there’s one company that has been an influence in how to market products, Procter & Gamble stands out as the prime example. While its founders William Procter and James Gamble were for manufacturing quality products the company also embarked in branding their products to make them distinct from others.

Procter & Gamble was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1837. The company initially produced candles and soap. These were commodity items but the company later on included their name and logo in the packaging so consumers knew who made the products. Due to the quality of their goods they were able to establish brand loyalty with their customers.  Consumers would only buy soap and candle if they knew it was from Proctor & Gamble.  Today, this is what all companies are trying to achieve- brand loyalty.

The company’s attention to branding led to the rise in popularity of Ivory soap. This soap was innovative in itself because its composition allowed it to float on water.  Beyond its good qualities the company paid attention to its wrapping and overall all packaging. It also included heavily advertising the product.

Its use of advertising for its soap products on radio and television is the main reason we now have soap operas.  Aside from soap other notable products include Crest, the first toothpaste with fluoride in it which effectively helped fight tooth decay.  Pampers truly changed the dynamics of diapers. From being a cloth that had to be washed, people simply disposed of them.

Outside the area of branding and product innovation, the company in 1887 introduced profit sharing which was a pioneering move in those times. Even today not all companies practice it.

Procter & Gamble is now over 170 years old and still a master at product branding.

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: